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Ngā Wiki o Matariki at Hastings District Libraries

Web Page 2For more details on the events and actvities Hastings District Libraries have for Matariki, visit our Events page here or pick up a guide in the library.

Matariki signals a time of change and growth embodied in the stars
Tupuānuku, Tupuārangi, Ururangi

Matariki descends during the Tangaroa nights of Hakiharatuara – 2 June 2021.

These are the most sacred nights commemorating and remembering the year that has been, and especially those whose souls are aboard Uruao Ngā Puna Ariki – Te Waka o Tamarereti. The new year itself commences on 11 June with the sighting of the first moon (tirea) of Pipiri.
The last two years Hastings District Libraries celebrated the stars Pohutukawa, Hiwa-i-te-rangi, Matariki, Waitī, Waitā and Waipuna-ā-rangi. This year when Puangarua moves during the Tangaroa nights of Pipiri when Matariki rises on 2 July, we will celebrate the stars Tupuānuku, Tupuārangi, and Ururangi.

Tupuānuku is the star associated with food grown in the ground from Papatūānuku.

Tupu meaning to grow, sprout or originate,’ for seedlings or buds.Nuku is the shortened version of Papatūānuku the earth mother and wife of Ranginui the sky father from which all living things originate. Their sons Rongo-ma-Tāne, atua of cultivated food, Haumia-tiketike, atua of uncultivated food and Tāne-mahuta contribute to the wellbeing of tāngata by providing gifts to build whare, waka, kākahu, rongoā and kai.

There are spiritual and cultural protocols of kawa and tikanga to follow which acknowledges the whakapapa mauri and mana of all living things.

Tupuārangi is the star associated with food that comes from the sky, for it was Ranginui who married Papatūānuku.

Tane-mahuta atua of the ngahere (forest, bush), where manu (birds), kereru (pigeon) and titi (mutton bird) were harvested in large numbers, cooked and then preserved in their own fat. A diverse range of foods were consumed: fruits, berries, juices, leaves, fungus, even Te aitanga pepeke (insects) like the kēkerewai (small green beetle) that nestled upon the mānuka flowers.

As with many other cultures, the sharing of kai and celebration were special.Māori would take note of how these stars influenced the coming season as survival depended on correctly identifying the signals.

Ururangi: Uru, meaning west wind or north-west wind, is the star that determines the nature of the winds for the year.

Tūpuna travelled from Hawaiki, an impressive journey using knowledge of the sun, moon, stars and the strength of the wind. They followed the navigational paths of the birds and tides and eventually landed safely in Aotearoa.

Matariki stars support each other - Ururangi assists Tupuānuku and Tupuārangi. Seedlings, fungi spores, insects and birds harness the wind, establishing new areas to germinate and grow.

Manutukutuku are kites in the shape of a bird (manu).

It was believed that birds could carry messages between humans and gods. Understanding the strength and liveliness of Ururangi (wind star), the flight of manutukutuku came into play Legends were written, crops were guarded, battles were fought, boundaries marked and occasionally the manu were used as sails on waka. Throughout the Pacific kites were usually made with aute, the bark of the paper mulberry, which is also used to make tapa. In New Zealand, however, the paper mulberry doesn’t grow very well, so kites were usually made of raupō, cutty grass or flax. The frames of the kites were made from kareao, mānuka, or toetoe.

Te Wa Pakiwaitara - Storytime
Makerspaces
Bakers Club
Manutukutuku Workshop
Ephemeral Art
Appi Haora
Whakarongo Mai Storytime Pakeke

Hastings

Monday 10.00am - 5.30pm
Tuesday 9.00am - 7.00pm
Wednesday 9.00am - 5.30pm
Thursday 9.00am - 7.00pm
Friday 9.00am - 5.30pm
Saturday 10.00am - 4.00pm
Sunday 1.00pm - 4.00pm

Havelock North

Monday 10.00am - 5.30pm
Tuesday 9.00am - 5.30pm
Wednesday 9.00am - 5.30pm
Thursday 9.00am - 5.30pm
Friday 9.00am - 5.30pm
Saturday 10.00am - 4.00pm
Sunday CLOSED

Flaxmere

Monday 10.00am - 5.30pm
Tuesday 9.00am - 5.30pm
Wednesday 9.00am - 5.30pm
Thursday 9.00am - 5.30pm
Friday 9.00am - 5.30pm
Saturday 10.00am - 4.00pm
Sunday CLOSED

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